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Renters beware: Two violations could end in eviction

New law imposes a "two strike" like system on renters (Robert Jackson)
New law imposes a "two strike" like system on renters (Robert Jackson)
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Updated: 7/01/2013 7:59 pm
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- Two strikes and you're out. Thats the concept behind a new law that goes into effect Monday.

If you're a renter you may want to give your lease agreement a second look because the state statutes just got more stringent, leaving little room for 2nd and third chances.

Renting in the state of Florida now comes with what some are calling a two strike system.
For example, you have debris in your front yard from a big storm and your landlord gives your a written warning that you have 7 days to clean it up. If you don't or if you are found in violation again within the next year, your next notice will likely be an eviction.

"I think that's unfair," said Rick Butler, former landlord and now a current renter.
He received a warning about the plants that line his balcony, and says he's concerned about this new "two-strikes" policy.

"I could be away on vacation for two weeks, I come back I'm an excellent tenant I pay on time and all of a sudden I have some kind of legal proceeding against me," said Butler.

Action News found another possible area of concern for tenants, but a relief for landlords.

"If you're paying partial rent, a landlord would provide you with a receipt stating the balance that's due, and whatever agreed upon time that the parties come to," said Matthew Hinson, an attorney representing landlords and tenants. That means your landlord can give you at least three days notice to come up with the rest of the rent. If you don't, you can be evicted.

There's another Key provision to this legislation dealing with attorney fees.
According to the statute, if your property manager breaches it's duty of maintenance, and you get injured because of it, you will not be awarded attorney fees for your claim.



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